A LOOK BEHIND THE CURTAIN

            Ever wonder how those great fight scenes in your favorite action films are put together?

            The answer is very slowly and with lots of attention to detail…and safety.

            Below you’ll find the run-up to something I recently shot.  While I’m not at liberty to disclose any details right now, have a look and you’ll get the idea.  And be sure to give a respectful nod to the stunt performers who not only mapped out the moves but doubled for the show’s stars when the action got rough.

4.29.2022

5 thoughts on “A LOOK BEHIND THE CURTAIN”

  1. That’s quite a scene Richard. Thank you for sharing it here. The intensity is already there, even in the rehearsal. I really appreciate how your camera work made me feel the action and a part of the fight. I also think this is a great scene to point out the value of carrying a good depth of field vs shallow in certain scenes. Holding the depth of field makes the viewer feel the confines of the cell — the space and movement of the fight contained by the cell block. This makes it even more intense. I look forward to seeing the entire story.

  2. Very interesting. Was this the first rehearsal for the scene?
    It seemed somewhat slow and methodical as if it’s a first run
    at it. Hopefully can see the final production with this scene
    in it. Also, are you doing the final shooting through the bars from
    a bystanders perspective?

  3. Ken – Yes, this was more or less the first 1\2 speed run through. The actual scene with the real actors was shot at a very energetic pace. And no, I didn’t just shoot through the bars. This angle was used to show a broad view of the action from the widest spot possible. The final scene has very many different shots, all done from inside the bars, close to the actors.

  4. Guy – The heavy depth of field here is a result of shooting this 1\2-speed rehearsal on an iPhone. The depth of field in the actual scene varies according to the lenses I used. When I needed to get in super-tight for some sort of detail, the DOF naturally shrinks, isolating the actor and emphasizing whatever I wanted to. I feel that the scene turned out very well. I’ll post it in its entirety as soon as I am permitted to.

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