LIGHTING DIAGRAM #30 – ISHTAR

            Picking up where I left off last September with the thread on Elaine May’s Ishtar (1987)…             This scene between Dustin Hoffman and Warren Beatty takes place on a high ledge of a Manhattan apartment building.  The first photograph illustrates how it played out with the stuntmen.  For the primary action however, a scaffold … Continue reading “LIGHTING DIAGRAM #30 – ISHTAR”

2.19.2021

ABUSIVE WORKING HOURS #2

            Last Tuesday’s post gave hell to the industry’s endorsement of abusive working hours.  Now I’ll try to answer why the situation exists as it does.             In the United States the majority of film crews put in draconian amounts of time on the job.  This’s not only approved of by the producing entities, it’s … Continue reading “ABUSIVE WORKING HOURS #2”

2.16.2021

ABUSIVE WORKING HOURS #1

            This may seem a strange topic for a period in which the film industry is running far below its capacity, but what better time to tackle such an important issue?             “Our responsibility is to the visual image of the film as well as the well-being of the crew.  The continuing and expanding practice … Continue reading “ABUSIVE WORKING HOURS #1”

2.9.2021

MORE ACTOR AMAZEMENT

            There are those who claim we’re all actors in some way, but I don’t know the first thing about how to do it.  I love actors and recognize a great performance when I see one; I’ve also been privileged on many occasions to have witnessed deeply moving efforts from just a few feet away.  … Continue reading “MORE ACTOR AMAZEMENT”

1.26.2021

THE POWER OF CRAFT ISN’T LIMITED TO CINEMATOGRAPHY

            Force of Evil (1948), is a great film noir that seems to have been unjustly forgotten.  Directed by Abraham Polonsky, it has an amazing cast and features a compelling narrative that’s stylishly told.  It’s also beautifully shot by George Clemens, ASC, who went on to become the principal cinematographer on the late ’50’s-early-60’s TV … Continue reading “THE POWER OF CRAFT ISN’T LIMITED TO CINEMATOGRAPHY”

1.19.2021